One of Kurt Cobain's childhood homes is for sale and it could be yours

Publish Date
Monday, 13 December 2021, 11:33AM

One of Kurt Cobain's childhood homes is for sale, and the listing price is shockingly affordable. As Rolling Stone points out, the late Nirvana frontman lived in the house on 413 S Fleet Street in Montesano, Washington from 1978-82. Kurt moved in with his dad Don following his parents' divorce at the age of 11 and stayed until his father remarried and his stepmom moved in with two other children. In March 1982, Kurt moved in to his grandparents' trailer, which marked the beginning of his chaotic teenage years.

"Your chance to own a piece of nostalgic HISTORY and a Gorgeously updated home!" The Redfin listing reads. "That's right this home was once home to the one and only KURT COBAIN! You'll find his room was the very unique "Ship" room. Great 2 story with a basement, 4 bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms & over 1,600 sqft of living space."

The house is listed at $279,900, which might have something to do with the fact that the realtors didn't realize the significance of the building until days before it went on the market.

“None of us knew it was [Cobain's] until the photographer [Alicia Tisdale] took a picture of it,” realtor Colt Fairley told Rolling Stone. “She knows Aberdeen pretty well. She was like, ‘Oh my god, this is Kurt Cobain’s house.’ His dad, Donald, tried to make the entire house into a ship.”

Unsurprisingly, the house already has multiple offers. “It’s been booked out all day,” Fairley said. “We’re probably going to let it ride through the weekend. I think some people are just looking at it to go looking at it, to be honest. It’s unique. This is something no one knew about.”

The news of the listing comes just months after Kurt's main childhood home in Aberdeen, Washington was officially recognized by Washington’s Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation as a historical landmark.

See photos and check out the listing here.

This article was first published on iheart.com and is republished here with permission